Monday, May 22, 2006

Incarcerating Criminals Reduces Crime

That’s my headline, here’s the AP’s: Number of U.S. Inmates Rises 2 Percent

Interestingly, Associated Press writer Elizabeth White doesn’t mention anywhere in her article (excerpted below) that there has been a concurrent reduction in the nation’s crime rate, see here and here.

Whether Ms. White is too dim to see the inverse relationship between the incarceration rate and the crime rate or that its existence is a fact best ignored so as not to deflate her story, is unknown.
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Prisons and jails added more than 1,000 inmates each week for a year, putting almost 2.2 million people, or one in every 136 U.S. residents, behind bars by last summer.

The total on June 30, 2005, was 56,428 more than at the same time in 2004, the government reported Sunday. That 2.6 percent increase from mid-2004 to mid-2005 translates into a weekly rise of 1,085 inmates.

Of particular note was the gain of 33,539 inmates in jails, the largest increase since 1997, researcher Allen J. Beck said. That was a 4.7 percent growth rate, compared with a 1.6 percent increase in people held in state and federal prisons.

Prisons accounted for about two-thirds of all inmates, or 1.4 million, while the other third, nearly 750,000, were in local jails, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Beck, the bureau's chief of corrections statistics, said the increase in the number of people in the 3,365 local jails is due partly to their changing role. Jails often hold inmates for state or federal systems, as well as people who have yet to begin serving a sentence.

"The jail population is increasingly unconvicted [sic]," Beck said. "Judges are perhaps more reluctant to release people pretrial."

The report by the Justice Department agency found that 62 percent of people in jails have not been convicted, meaning many of them are awaiting trial… [Ed. - In other words, people who are denied bail or those who a bail bondsman won’t risk bailing out]

Men were 10 times to 11 times more likely than women to be in prison or jail, but the number of women behind bars was growing at a faster rate, said Paige M. Harrison, the report's other author.

The racial makeup of inmates changed little in recent years, Beck said. In the 25-29 age group, an estimated 11.9 percent of black men were in prison or jails, compared with 3.9 percent of Hispanic males and 1.7 percent of white males.

Marc Mauer, executive director of The Sentencing Project, which supports alternatives to prison, said the incarceration rates for blacks were troubling.

"It's not a sign of a healthy community when we've come to use incarceration at such rates," he said. [Ed. – Whose health are we talking about, the preyed upon or the predators’?]

Mauer also criticized sentencing guidelines, which he said remove judges' discretion, and said arrests for drug and parole violations swell prisons.

"If we want to see the prison population reduced, we need a much more comprehensive approach to sentencing and drug policy," he said. [Ed. – Given the resultant reduction in crime, I doubt most Americans “want to see the prison population reduced”]

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home